Posted in Calculating, Fluency, Games

Playing with cards 4

Odd addition

2 – 5 players

You need:

Digit cards 1 – 10 (a set for each player) or playing cards with the picture cards removed.

To play:

Shuffle the cards and place in the centre.

Each player takes two cards from the pile, adds the cards together and tells everyone the total.

If the total is odd, the player keeps the cards. If the total is even, the cards are returned to the centre pile.

Play ten rounds or until there are no cards left.

The winner is the player with most cards.

Screenshot 2020-06-08 12.22.57

Variations

  • Leave the picture cards in and give them a value e.g. J = 11, Q = 12, K =13
  • Subtract the numbers on the cards instead of adding.
  • Deal 3 cards to each person.
  • Keep adding the totals of the cards you keep. First player to reach a total of 50 wins.

 

Posted in Conceptual understanding, Fluency, Games, Logical reasoning

Playing with cards 3

Largest number

2 – 4 players

You need:

Digit cards 1 – 9  (one set per player, shuffled) or a pack of playing cards, Ace to 9 only.

To play:

Deal 2 cards to each player.

Players turn over their cards and make the largest 2-digit number they can with the cards they have been dealt.

The player with the largest number scores a point.

Play ten rounds. The winner is the player with most points.

Screenshot 2020-06-08 12.01.45

Variations

  • Deal 3 cards to each player and make 3-digit numbers.
  • Try 4 or 5- digit numbers.
  • Get a point for the smallest number rather than the largest.
  • Play more than 10 rounds.
Posted in Calculating, Fluency, Games

Playing with cards 2

Break the Bank at 27

A game for 2 – 5 players

You need:

A pack of playing cards – picture cards worth 10, Ace worth 1

To play

Deal out the whole pack of cards to players. Players put cards face down in a pile in front of them.

The first player turns over the top card and puts it in the centre. The next player puts their top card in the centre and adds the value of the two cards. Play continues like this, each player placing their card on the centre pile and adding the value to the total. When the total reaches 27 or more, that player takes the cards from the centre and puts them in their pile.

Screenshot 2020-06-08 10.44.23

For example, in this game:

Digit Dog put down 2 and said “2”.

Calculating Cat put down 9, added it to the 2 and said “11”

Digit Dog put down 6, added it to 11 and said “17”.

Calculating Cat put down 6, added it to 17 and said “23”.

Digit Dog is now hoping to turn over a 4 or more so that he can take the cards.

The game continues for an agreed time or until one player has no cards.

The winner is the player with most cards.

Variations

Give the Ace and picture cards different values e.g. A = 11, J = 12, Q = 13, K = 14.

Change the number that breaks the bank – make it more or less than 27.

Posted in Calculating, Fluency, Games

Playing with cards

Quick addition

Two players

You need:

A pack of playing cards – picture cards are worth 10, aces are worth 1

To play:

Deal out all the cards to the two players and place in a pile, face down.

Players take turns to say 1, 2, 3 GO! and both players turn over their top card.

Players add the two numbers on the cards and the first one to say “the total is…..” (correctly) wins the two cards.

Play until all cards have been used, then each player counts how many cards they have won.

The winner is the player with most cards.

 

Screenshot 2020-06-08 09.23.29

Variations

Play quick subtraction where players subtract the smaller number from the larger.

Play quick multiplication where players multiply the two numbers and say “the product is…..”

To make the game easier:

  • Remove the picture cards
  • Just use cards Ace to 5.
  • Play with digit cards – make several sets of 0 – 5 cards.

To make the game more challenging:

  • Give the picture cards different values: J = 10, Q = 11, K = 12
  • Have 3 or 4 players and add all the numbers.
Posted in Logical reasoning, Patterns

Making patterns 5

Screenshot 2020-06-04 08.30.08

Calculating Cat has made an AB pattern with the sticks:

purple, yellow, purple, yellow, purple, yellow……….

See if you can use her rule to make a pattern with sounds or movements. You could try:

  • Using your hands to clap, click, clap, click, clap, click……….
  • Making sounds such as whistle, shout, whistle, shout………..
  • Using movements such as hop, jump, hop, jump, hop, jump……or
  • stand, sit, stand, sit, stand, sit ……….or
  • wave, stamp, wave, stamp, wave, stamp………….or
  • run, stop, run, stop……..

 

What about this pattern? Look for the rule then use it to make a pattern with sounds or movements.

Screenshot 2020-06-04 08.38.49

 

Screenshot 2020-06-04 08.45.36

 

Play with patterns:

  • One person makes a repeating pattern using objects. Another person works out the rule and uses it to make a pattern with sounds or movements.
  • One person makes a repeating pattern with sounds or movements. Another person copies it.
  • Look for repeating patterns in your environment. Say the rule and use it to make a pattern using sounds or movements.
Posted in Logical reasoning, Patterns

Making patterns 4

Screenshot 2020-06-03 10.38.51

Digit Dog has made lots of linear repeating patterns, so now he is exploring cyclic patterns.

Screenshot 2020-06-03 10.48.38

What do you notice about Digit Dog’s pattern?

He had to make sure that the pattern continued round and round the plate.

Try making some cyclic patterns using plates and objects.

Draw a pattern around the edge of a page.

Make a pattern with a mistake and ask someone else to spot it..

Screenshot 2020-06-03 11.03.45

Spot the mistake.

What is Digit Dog’s rule?

Where has he gone wrong? How do you know?

What does he have to do to put it right?

Posted in Logical reasoning, Patterns

Making patterns 3

Calculating Cat has found a paper napkin.

Screenshot 2020-06-03 09.36.14

What can you see? What do you notice?

Look at the rows of cakes. Look at the columns.

Describe the cakes.

How many cakes with hearts are there?

How many brown cakes?

How many cakes have cases that are not pink?

Screenshot 2020-06-03 09.47.10

Calculating Cat noticed an AB pattern in the second row. She used the rule to make her own pattern.

Look at the two patterns. What is the same? What is different?

Try making your own pattern with different objects. Remember the rule. Your pattern can go on and on and on………….

Screenshot 2020-06-03 09.56.16

Now Calculating Cat has an ABAC pattern.

Draw coloured lines to copy Calculating Cat’s pattern. Continue the pattern to the end of your page.

Investigate the other rows and columns on the paper napkin.

Look for patterns that decorate other things around the house and outside. Which patterns are repeating patterns?

Posted in Logical reasoning, Patterns

Making patterns 2

Digit Dog has made another AB pattern using buttons.

buttons AB

Can you work out the rule?

What sort of button would come next?

Play What’s missing?

what's missing buttons

What sort of button needs to go in the gap?

Make your own repeating pattern, take one object away and ask someone to work out what is missing.

You can use anything to make a pattern………..

Screenshot 2020-06-01 12.24.47Screenshot 2020-06-01 12.24.41

Look at Calculating Cat’s pattern.

Screenshot 2020-06-01 12.28.50

What is the rule?

Why is it different from the previous patterns?

This pattern has 3 objects in the repeat.

Orange, blue, pink, orange, blue, pink ………..

ABC, ABC………….

What colour button comes next?

Posted in Logical reasoning, Patterns

Making patterns

Pattern is an important part of mathematics. Recognising that a sequence of objects makes a pattern, being able to copy, extend and explain the pattern is an important step towards understanding number patterns.

Digit Dog has been making a repeating pattern – a sequence that is governed by a rule. What is Digit Dog’s rule?

outdoor AB pattern DD

Can you copy Digit Dog’s pattern?

Can you continue the pattern?

Calculating Cat has also made a repeating pattern.

outdoor AB pattern CC

Look at both patterns.

What is the same? What is different?

These are both AB patterns. Two objects form the repeating unit.

Digit Dog has used a stick and a leaf:

Stick, leaf, stick, leaf, stick, leaf…………..

A, B, A, B, A, B……………..

Calculating Cat has used different objects but there are still two objects repeating over and over:

A, B, A, B, A, B……………..

Leaf, stone, leaf, stone, leaf, stone ………….

Can you make an AB pattern?

Start a pattern and see if someone else can continue it.