Posted in Logical reasoning, Problem solving

100 square jigsaw

Digit Dog and Calculating Cat are doing a 100 square jigsaw. They are looking at each piece and deciding where it goes on the grid.

Screenshot 2020-06-18 12.37.30

Have a go at completing the puzzle.

Download the blank grid here. Download this 100 square and cut along the thicker lines to create the jigsaw pieces.

Think about which piece you are going to put in first. Why have you chosen that one? Which piece has the lowest number on it? Where does that go? How do you know?

Where does the highest number go?

Whenever you place a piece on the board, explain why you are placing it there.

Can you see patterns to help you?

Challenge yourself

  • Turn all the pieces face down. Turn over one piece at a time and work out where it goes on the grid. Explain your thinking.
  • If you want to try an interactive version of this puzzle, go to https://nrich.maths.org/5572
  • Print this 100 square and cut out your own puzzle pieces for a friend to solve.

 

 

 

Posted in Calculating, Logical reasoning, Money, Problem solving

How much is in the purse?

5 coins

Calculating Cat has 5 coins in her purse.

Think about which coins they could be. Get some coins and work out the possibilities.

What is the largest amount that could be in the purse? Which coins would that be?

What is the smallest amount that could be in the purse? Which coins would that be?

Digit Dog thinks that Calculating Cat might have 6p in her purse. Which coins is he thinking of? What about 10p?

Explore which coins could be in the purse. How many different amounts could there be?

Record the different amounts you have found.

Organise your answers so that you can be systematic and work out all the possible amounts.

What if there were fewer coins in the purse? Try it with just 2 or 3 coins.

What if the coins in the purse were silver coins?

What if there were only 1p, 2p, 5p and 10p coins in the purse?

What if no coin was worth more than 20p?

 

Posted in Additive relationships, Calculating, Fluency, Problem solving

Counting and calculating with target boards – numbers to 100

Develop fluency with the target boards. Use the target boards to:

  • recall and remember useful number facts;
  • use number facts to calculate mentally;
  • explain thinking and methods of calculating.
  • use mathematical language correctly

Target board 4

Print Target Board 4

  • Say each number out loud.
  • Say the numbers in order – from smallest to largest and back again.
  • Point at a number – how many tens and how many ones make that number?
  • Point at a number – what is 10 more than that number?
  • Point at a number and count in 10s from that number. How far can you count?

Look at the target board and:

Find two numbers that total / add up to 30 / 40 / 50.

Find more than two numbers that make those totals.

Choose your own totals to make.

Record your work.

  • How do you know you are correct?
  • How did you work it out? Explain your thinking.

Find two numbers with a difference of 10, a difference of 12………… What other differences can you find?

 

Find the column with the highest total. Which column is easiest to add up? Why?

Find the number that is double 14, double 7, double 20………..

Find the number that is half of 80, half of 36………

Find the answer to 5 x 2, 9 x 5, 3 x 4…………..make up some questions of your own.

 

Find numbers that are multiples of 5 (are in the 5 times table), multiples of 2, multiples of 10……..

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Additive relationships, Calculating, Fluency, Problem solving

Calculating with target boards (4)

Develop fluency with the target boards. Use the target boards to:

  • recall and remember useful number facts;
  • use number facts to calculate mentally;
  • explain thinking and methods of calculating.
  • use mathematical language correctly.

 

Target board 3

Print Target Board 3

  • Say each number out loud.
  • Say the numbers in order.
  • Point at a number and then find that number of objects.
  • Point at a number – what is 10 more than that number?

Ask children to look at the target board and:

Find two numbers that total / add up to 20.

  • How do you know you are correct?
  • How did you work it out? Explain your thinking.
  • How many pairs of numbers can you find?
  • Make a list of the pairs you find.
  • Make up a number story to go with your pairs of numbers e.g. 13 + 7 = 20 There were 13 ladybirds sitting on a leaf, 7 more came along and now there are 20.

Find more than two numbers that total 20?

Find numbers that make other totals.

 

Find the total of the numbers in the first column. How did you work it out? Which numbers did you add first? What did you notice? Did you notice that 18 + 2 = 20? How does this help?

Find the sum of the numbers in the bottom row.  How did you do that? Which numbers did you add first? What did you notice? What is the easiest way to add up the numbers?

Find the column with the highest total. Which column is easiest to add up? Why?

Find the number that is double 1, double 2, double 3………..

Find the number that is half of 10, half of 12………

 

Find two numbers with a difference of 2, a difference of 4…………

Make a list of your numbers. Put them in order. What do you notice? Can you find any patterns?

Problem solving with the target board

My total is 16 – find two numbers that you can add together to make my total.  Can you find three numbers to make my total?

One of my numbers is 7. When I add it to another number, my total is 13. What is my second number?

I am thinking of a number and when I count on 5, I say 14. Find the number I started with.

I am thinking of a number and when I count back 3, I say 8.  Find the number I started with. 

I am thinking of a number. I doubled it to make 16. What is my number?

My difference is 5 – find two numbers on the target board that have a difference of 5.

I am thinking of two numbers. When I take away the smaller from the larger my answer is 4. What numbers could I be thinking of? How many pairs of numbers can you find? How do you know you have found them all?

One of my numbers is 15. When I subtract another number, I am left with 9. What is my second number?

Make up some of your own problems like this.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Additive relationships, Calculating, Fluency, Problem solving

Calculating with target boards 2

Develop fluency with the target boards. Use the target boards to:

  • recall and remember useful number facts;
  • use number facts to calculate mentally;
  • explain thinking and methods of calculating.
  • use mathematical language correctly.

Target board 2

Print Target Board 2

  • Say each number out loud.
  • Put objects on each number – check that you have the correct amount.
  • Say the numbers in order.

Practise addition with the target board.

Ask children to:

Find two numbers that total 5.

  • How do you know you are correct?
  • How did you work it out? Explain your thinking.
  • How many pairs of numbers can you find?
  • Make a list of the pairs you find.

Find numbers that total 10.

  • How do you know you are correct?
  • How did you work it out? Explain your thinking.
  • How many pairs of numbers can you find?
  • Make a list of the pairs you find.

Make up a number story to go with your pairs of numbers, e.g. 3 + 2 = 5 Digit Dog ate 3 bones for breakfast and 2 bones for dinner. He ate 5 bones altogether. How many different stories can you make?

Find other totals and make up stories to go with them.

 

Find the total of the numbers in the first column. How did you work it out?

Find the sum of the numbers in the bottom row.  How did you do that?

Find the column with the highest total. Which column is easiest to add up? Why?

Find the number that is double 1, double 2, double 3………..

 

Point at a number and say what double that number is e.g. point at 5 and say “double 5 is 10”

Problem solving with the target board

My total is 8 – find two numbers that you can add together to make my total.  Can you find three numbers to make my total?

One of my numbers is 5. When I add it to another number, my total is 7. What is my second number?

I am thinking of a number. I count on 3 and get to 8. What number did I start with?

I am thinking of a number. I doubled it to make 8. What is my number?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Posted in Patterns, Problem solving

Patterns with bunting

Digit Dog is making some bunting ready for the VE Day celebrations.

DD bunting

He has made a pattern with his flags.

Which colour flag will he put next? How do you know?

What colour will the 10th flag be? What about the 16th flag? How did you work it out?

If he uses 30 flags, what colour will the last flag be?

Can you make a pattern like Digit Dog?

 

Calculating Cat has made a different pattern.

CC bunting

What do you notice about Calculating Cat’s pattern?

Which flag will she put next? How do you know?

What will the 12th flag be? What about the 17th? How did you work it out?

If she uses 28 flags, which flag will be last?

 

Look at both sets of flags.

What is the same about them? What is different?

 

Try making your own bunting. Make some flags and decide on a pattern. See if someone else can spot your pattern.

 

Posted in Calculating, Conceptual understanding, Easter, Logical reasoning, Problem solving

Two eggs left

Digit Dog has been eating his Easter mini eggs.

He has 2 eggs left.

Calculating Cat is wondering how many eggs he could have had to start with and how many he could have eaten to be left with 2.

two eggs left

How many eggs could he have had at the start? What if it was 6? How many would he have eaten to be left with 2?

What other numbers could he have started with?

What number do you know he couldn’t have had at the start?

How many different solutions can you find?

How did you work it out? Explain your reasoning.

Can you record your solutions?

Can you put your solutions in order?

What if………..

……………he had a different number of eggs left?

………….he was eating bones not eggs?

………..you made up a problem like this about your Easter eggs?

Posted in Easter, Numicon, Problem solving

Collect the Easter Eggs

Collecting eggs

Digit Dog is collecting eggs from the Easter Bunny’s store. Here is a map of the store. (download and print your store here

Digit Dog counters

Screenshot 2019-04-03 15.31.31

There are 8 rooms and the number tells you how many eggs are in each room. Digit Dog has to go into the rooms and collect the eggs BUT he can only go into each room ONCE.

How many  can Digit Dog collect?

How many different ways can he go though the store?

Can you record his routes? How might you do this?

Screenshot 2019-04-03 15.49.25

Can you do it a different way, Digit Dog, and collect more eggs?

What’s the most eggs you can collect?

What’s the smallest number of eggs?

Look for children who are planning the routes and can explain their thinking.

Make it easier

1. Use the blank store and put just numbers 1, 2 and 3 in the rooms.

2. Put mini-eggs in the rooms and collect them.

Extend the challenge

Use the blank store and put higher numbers in each room.

Challenge children to find all possible routes and to explain how they know they have found them all.

Posted in Easter, Logical reasoning, Numicon, Problem solving, Strategic competence

Cover the Chick

Easter animals

For those of you who enjoyed the Chinese New Year activity Cover the animals, here’s an Easter version.

Digit Dog and Calculating Cat are using the Numicon® shapes to cover the picture of the Easter Chick .

You will need the Chick picture (download and print on yellow paper) and a set of Numicon® shapes. Ask learners to use the Numicon® shapes to cover the chick in any way they can.

Screenshot 2019-04-03 13.39.12

How many different ways can you do it? Describe what you’ve done.

Compare your chick with your friend’s. What’s the same and what’s different? How did you check that your way was different from your friend’s?

Play What’s missing?

  1. When the chick is covered with shapes, one child closes their eyes, another takes away one shape. Which one is missing? How do you know?
  2. Put some shapes in a feely bag, take them out one at a time and place on the chick. Can you find the shapes you want by touch alone?  This helps with visualising the shapes.

Ask:

How did you cover the chick? How many shapes did you use? Talk about how you chose the shapes. Which shapes were most useful?

Can you cover the chick again but using different shapes?

How many different ways can you do it?

What is the fewest number of shapes you can use? The most?

Can you just use odd shapes? Even shapes?

What if you weren’t allowed to use the same shape more than once? How many ways can you do it? Is this more difficult? What are you thinking?

Can you use one shape repeatedly to cover the chick? Which shapes will work? Which won’t? Why?

Encourage learners to describe and explain what they are doing.

Look for those learners who have a strategy for choosing shapes and those who use trial and improvement.

Look for learners who swap shapes for other equivalent shapes each time they look for a new arrangement rather than starting from the beginning.

Encourage learners to put all their completed chicks together and ask “what is the same?” “what is different?”

 

Try the same activities with the Easter Bunny  (download here).

 

IMG_1332

Posted in Chinese New Year, Numicon, Problem solving

2020 is the Chinese Year of the Rat

It’s the Year of the Rat

It’s the Chinese year of the rat and Digit Dog and Calculating Cat are using the Numicon® shapes to cover the picture of the rat.

You will need the rat picture (download here) and a set of Numicon® shapes. Ask learners to use the Numicon® shapes to cover the rat in any way they can.

cover the rat

How many different ways can you do it? Describe what you’ve done.

Compare your rat with your friend’s. What’s the same and what’s different? How did you check that your way was different from your friend’s?

  1. When the rat is covered, one child closes their eyes, another takes away one shape. Which one is missing? How do you know?
  2. Put some shapes in a feely bag, take them out one at a time and place on the rat. Can you find the ones you want by touch alone?  This helps with visualising the shapes.

Ask:

How did you cover the rat? How many shapes did you use? Talk about how you chose the shapes. Which shapes were most useful?

Can you cover the rat using different shapes?

How many different ways can you do it?

What is the fewest number of shapes you can use? The most?

Can you just use odd shapes? Even shapes?

What if you weren’t allowed to use the same shape more than once? How many ways can you do it? Is this more difficult? What are you thinking?

Encourage learners to describe and explain what they are doing.

Look for those learners who had a strategy for choosing shapes and those who did it randomly.

Look for learners who swap shapes for other equivalent shapes each time they look for a new arrangement rather than starting from the beginning.

Encourage learners to put all their completed rats together and ask “what is the same?” “what is different?”

 

Try the same activities with the other animals (download here).

 

IMG_0849