Posted in Additive relationships, Calculating, Fluency

Bone Splat!

Digit Dog and Calculating Cat are playing a game of Bone Splat!

Screenshot 2020-07-01 08.57.08

You need:

A “splat” and some bones (download here).

To play:

First decide on the total number of bones – in this game they are exploring pairs of numbers that total 10. Count out that number of bones and put a digit card in the empty box on the “splat”.

Player One: close your eyes.

Player Two: hide some of the bones under the “splat”.

Player One: open your eyes and work out how many bones have been hidden under the splat.

Explain how you worked it out. Convince your partner that you are right.

Encourage learners to explain how they worked out the number of bones that are hidden. They might:

  • Use a 10 frame and objects (or visualise them like Calculating Cat);
  • Use a Numicon shape and toy bones or pegs;
  • Use a number line to count on;
  • Draw a picture;
  • Just know the number bond.

Record some number sentences to show how many different ways the bones can be hidden. For Digit Dog’s problem we could write: 6 + 4 = 10, 4 + 6 = 10, 10 – 4 = 6, 10 – 6 = 4.

 

Posted in Additive relationships, Calculating, Conceptual understanding, Strategic competence

What’s the question?

Digit Dog’s answer is 6 bones. What could the question be? Calculating Cat has thought of one question. How many questions can you think of?

6 bones

Encouraging learners to ask their own questions:

  • helps deepen their conceptual understanding.
  • encourages creativity and flexibility in thinking.
  • develops their strategic competence because they need to understand the structure of mathematical problems in order to make up their own. Creating your own questions is a challenging task.
  • develops their use of mathematical language and communication skills.
  • encourages use of logical reasoning as they explain their thinking and work systematically with the numbers in the questions they create.

Start with making up some subtraction questions like Calculating Cat’s question:

Digit Dog had 8 bones for his dinner. He ate 2. How many are left?  8 – 2 = 6

What if Digit Dog had a different number of bones to start with? Explore some different numbers. Which numbers can you use? Which can’t you use? What happens to the number of bones he eats if you change the number of bones he starts with?

Digit Dog had 9 bones for his dinner. He ate 3. How many are left?  9 – 3 = 6

Digit Dog had 10 bones for his dinner. He ate 4. How many are left?  10 – 4 = 6

Look for patterns. Work systematically.

What else could happen to the bones? Calculating Cat says he eats some. He could hide some, give some away, lose some……………be creative. Make up some funny problems. Remember his answer is 6 bones.

What if………..

………you made up some problems using addition? For example, Digit Dog had 4 bones, Calculating Cat gave him 2 more. How many does he have now? 4 + 2 = 6

 

 

Posted in Calculating, Fluency, Games

Go Fish 10

You play Go Fish 10 in the same way as Go Fish but the aim of the game is to make pairs that add up to 10.

Print Digit Dog’s cards here. You need 4 sets for 2 -3 players.

To play:

Deal each player 7 cards and spread out the remaining cards face down on the table. The aim of the game is to find pairs of cards that add up to 10.

Each player takes a turn. During a turn the player:

  1. Looks at the cards in their hand, if they have any pairs that add up to 10, they put them in front of them, face up.
  2. They then ask another player if they have a particular card so that they can make another pair. For example, player 1 might have a 4 in their hand and so ask aplayer 2 “do you have a 6?” – the card they need to make a pair that adds to 10. If player 2 has a 6 card, then they must give it to player 1. If they don’t have a 6 card, they say “go fish” and player 1 takes a card from the pool of cards on the table.
  3. If the player gets the card they asked for, either from the pool or from the other player, then they put their pair of cards in front of them, face up.

The game ends when one player runs out of cards or there are no more cards in the pool. The winner is the player with most pairs in front of them.

What if………

………….you played the game by making pairs of cards with a difference of 1?

Posted in Calculating, Fluency, Games

Double your number

Play Double your number

You need:

A game board.

A set of counters for each player. One colour for each player. You can download Digit Dog counters here – print on card and cut out or print on paper and stick them on milk bottle tops.

A dice.

Screenshot 2020-06-16 11.35.19

To play:

Take turns to throw a dice.

Double the number you throw, find the answer on the board and put your counter on it.

The winner is the first player to get three counters in a row.

Variation

Use a set of digit cards 1 – 19 and this board. Take turns to turn over a card, double the number and cover the answer on the board.

 

 

 

 

Posted in Calculating, Fluency, Games

Pass the Peas, Please

Digit Dog and Calculating Cat are playing Pass the Peas Please, a game they found on www.nrich.org

Screenshot 2020-06-16 10.20.55

A game for 2 or more players

You need:

A game board

2 dried peas (or beans or counters or sweets).

A plastic cup.

A piece of paper and pencil for each player.

To play:

Each player begins by writing 50 on their piece of paper.

Player 1 places two dried peas into the plastic cup and tosses them onto the game board.

They add the two numbers the peas land on and then take the total away from 50 and write the answer on their score sheet.

The next player takes a turn.

In the following turns, the players take the sum of the numbers away from the new remaining number.

The first player to reach zero wins.

Variations

Start with 0 on your score card and keep a running total of scores. The winner is the first to reach 50.

Use one pea instead of 2 and either subtract the number the pea lands on from 50 or keep a running total.

Use 3 peas to play the game.

Change the number you start with on your score card – make it higher or lower.

Each player takes a turn to throw two peas and add the numbers. The player with the highest total wins that round. Play 10 rounds.

Each player takes a turn to throw two peas and add the numbers. The player with the lowest total wins that round. Play 10 rounds.

Each player takes a turn to throw two peas and finds the difference between the numbers. The player with the highest difference wins that round. Play 10 rounds.

Use this board and start with 10 or 20 on your score cards.

Make your own boards. Choose the numbers you put on the board.

Posted in Additive relationships, Calculating, Logical reasoning, Making totals

Finding pairs

Digit Dog and Calculating Cat are using one set of digit cards 1 – 10 and looking for pairs that make 10.

Screenshot 2020-06-15 09.32.44

Download a set of digit cards here. You will need cards 1 to 10. Print double-sided to have Digit Dog on the back!

Download a baseboard here. Print two.

How many pairs that make 10 can you make? Put the cards on the baseboard.

Can you use all the cards? Which cards are left over? Why?

Try making some other totals – remember you can only use one set of cards from 1 – 10.

What if you make 9? Which cards are left over? Why?

What about 8?  or 12?  or 13?  or 11? Investigate the number of pairs and the cards that you cannot use.

Record your work. Write down the pairs of numbers and their totals.

 

Posted in Calculating, Fluency, Games, Logical reasoning

Playing with cards 5

Memory addition

Screenshot 2020-06-11 09.14.09

Any number of players or teams of 2.

You need:

A pack of playing cards arranged in a 13 x 4 array, face down. Ace = 1, picture cards = 10.

To play:

Player 1 turns over 2 cards and adds the values. Player 1 then turns over another two cards and adds the values. If the totals match, player 1 keeps the 4 cards and has another turn. If they do not match, the cards are turned face down again and it is player 2’s turn.

The game continues until no more matches can be made.

Can you remember where cards are? How will this help you? Watch carefully when other players are turning over cards.

Variations

  1. Play the same game but subtract the pairs of cards. If the answers match, keep the cards and have another turn. If they don’t, turn them face down again.
  2. On each turn, turn over two cards. If the numbers match, keep the cards and have another turn. If they don’t match turn the cards face down again.
  3. On each turn, turn over two cards. If the numbers and colours match, keep the cards and have another turn. If they don’t match turn the cards face down again.
  4. On each turn, turn over two cards. If both numbers are odd or both even, keep the cards and have another turn. If they don’t match turn the cards back face down.
  5. Make up your own rules!

 

Posted in Calculating, Fluency, Games

Playing with cards 4

Odd addition

2 – 5 players

You need:

Digit cards 1 – 10 (a set for each player) or playing cards with the picture cards removed.

To play:

Shuffle the cards and place in the centre.

Each player takes two cards from the pile, adds the cards together and tells everyone the total.

If the total is odd, the player keeps the cards. If the total is even, the cards are returned to the centre pile.

Play ten rounds or until there are no cards left.

The winner is the player with most cards.

Screenshot 2020-06-08 12.22.57

Variations

  • Leave the picture cards in and give them a value e.g. J = 11, Q = 12, K =13
  • Subtract the numbers on the cards instead of adding.
  • Deal 3 cards to each person.
  • Keep adding the totals of the cards you keep. First player to reach a total of 50 wins.

 

Posted in Calculating, Fluency, Games

Playing with cards 2

Break the Bank at 27

A game for 2 – 5 players

You need:

A pack of playing cards – picture cards worth 10, Ace worth 1

To play

Deal out the whole pack of cards to players. Players put cards face down in a pile in front of them.

The first player turns over the top card and puts it in the centre. The next player puts their top card in the centre and adds the value of the two cards. Play continues like this, each player placing their card on the centre pile and adding the value to the total. When the total reaches 27 or more, that player takes the cards from the centre and puts them in their pile.

Screenshot 2020-06-08 10.44.23

For example, in this game:

Digit Dog put down 2 and said “2”.

Calculating Cat put down 9, added it to the 2 and said “11”

Digit Dog put down 6, added it to 11 and said “17”.

Calculating Cat put down 6, added it to 17 and said “23”.

Digit Dog is now hoping to turn over a 4 or more so that he can take the cards.

The game continues for an agreed time or until one player has no cards.

The winner is the player with most cards.

Variations

Give the Ace and picture cards different values e.g. A = 11, J = 12, Q = 13, K = 14.

Change the number that breaks the bank – make it more or less than 27.

Posted in Calculating, Fluency, Games

Playing with cards

Quick addition

Two players

You need:

A pack of playing cards – picture cards are worth 10, aces are worth 1

To play:

Deal out all the cards to the two players and place in a pile, face down.

Players take turns to say 1, 2, 3 GO! and both players turn over their top card.

Players add the two numbers on the cards and the first one to say “the total is…..” (correctly) wins the two cards.

Play until all cards have been used, then each player counts how many cards they have won.

The winner is the player with most cards.

 

Screenshot 2020-06-08 09.23.29

Variations

Play quick subtraction where players subtract the smaller number from the larger.

Play quick multiplication where players multiply the two numbers and say “the product is…..”

To make the game easier:

  • Remove the picture cards
  • Just use cards Ace to 5.
  • Play with digit cards – make several sets of 0 – 5 cards.

To make the game more challenging:

  • Give the picture cards different values: J = 10, Q = 11, K = 12
  • Have 3 or 4 players and add all the numbers.
Posted in Calculating, Logical reasoning, Money

Toss the coin – nasty version

Toss the coin

Here’s a variation on the Toss the coin game.

You need:

A board for each player,

Two coins to toss,

A pile of coins to choose from (at least 32 for 2 players)

To play:

Take turns to toss your two coins:

  • One head and one tail – pick up two coins from the pile.
  • Two tails – take a coin from the other player’s grid.
  • Two heads – give one of the coins from your grid to the other player.

 

Put the coins on your grid, one on each square.

The game ends when one grid is full.

The winner is the player with the most money.

Which coins will you take from the other player? Which ones will you give away? Why?

 

Posted in Calculating, Fluency, Money

Toss the coin

Digit Dog has got a new game.

Toss the coin

To play the game you will need:

  • A board for each player (download boards here),
  • A coin for each player to toss,
  • A pile of assorted coins to choose from (at least 32 for 2 players).

To play:

Take turns to toss your coin. If it’s heads, choose one coin from the pile. If it’s tails, choose two coins.

Put the coin(s) on your grid, one on each square.

The first player to cover their grid wins.

At the end of the game count how much money you have altogether on your grid.

Variations

Use this board which has a smaller grid.

Screenshot 2020-05-19 12.17.46

Select the coins that go in the centre according to the needs of the child:

  • just use one pence coins for a simple counting game.
  • use coins up to 10p to make calculating easier.
  • use 5p, 10p and 20p to practise countng in 5s and 10s.

Change the rules:

The game ends when the first person fills their grid but the winner is the player with the most money on the board. If this is the rule, which coins are you going to try and pick up? 

The game ends when the first person fills their grid but the winner is the player with the least money on the board. How does changing the rule change the way you choose coins? Which coins do you want to pick up now?