Posted in Counting, Games

Play Go Fish

How to play Go Fish

For 2 – 3 players you need to print 4 sets of Digit Dog’s cards, onto card. The cards have numerals along with ten-frames.Screenshot 2020-06-29 08.58.52

The game can also be played with digit cards 0 – 10 or 0 – 20, or  a pack of playing cards.

To play:

Deal each player 7 cards and spread out the remaining cards face down on the table. The aim of the game is to find pairs of cards.

Each player takes a turn. During a turn the player:

  1. Looks at the cards in their hand, if they have any pairs, they put them in front of them, face up.
  2. They then ask another player if they have a particular card so that they can make another pair. For example, player 1 might ask player 2 “do you have a 5?” If player 2 has a 5 card, then they must give it to player 1. If they don’t have a 5 card, they say “go fish” and player 1 takes a card from the pool of cards on the table.
  3. If the player gets the card they asked for, either from the pool or from the other player, then they put their pair of cards in front of them, face up.

The game ends when one player runs out of cards or there are no more cards in the pool. The winner is the player with most pairs in front of them.

Posted in Counting, Number sense, Subitising, Ten frames

Ten frame games

1. Make the number

Screenshot 2020-06-24 11.27.44

You need:

For 3 – 5 players

Two sets of Digit Dog ten frames – large or small

Small objects such as pennies, buttons or counters.

To play:

One player is the leader and has the ten frame cards in a pile, face down.

Other players have a blank ten frame and ten small objects each.

The leader turns over the top card for a few seconds and then turns it back again.

Other players make the pattern they saw with objects on their ten frame.

The leader turns over the card again to check the patterns. Players who were correct score one point.

Play until all cards have been turned over, or one player reaches 10 points.

The winner is the player with most points.

Variations

  • Make the number on your ten frame one more than the number on the card.
  • Make the number on your ten frame two more than the number on the card.
  • Make the number on your ten frame one less than the number on the card.
  • Make the number on your ten frame two less than the number on the card.

 

2. Who has more?

 

Screenshot 2020-06-24 11.59.59

You need:

For 2 players

A set of Digit Dog ten frames for each player, in a pile face down.

To play:

On the count of 3, players turn over their top card. The player with more dogs wins the two cards and says “I have …….dogs. I have more dogs than you”. The other player says “I have ……. dogs. I have fewer dogs than you”.

The game ends when all cards have been turned over. The winner is the player with more cards.

Variation

  • The player with the fewer dogs wins the cards.
  • Say how many more and how many fewer dogs there are.Screenshot 2020-06-24 12.10.41
Posted in Counting, Number sense, Subitising, Ten frames

Ten frame flash

This game practises subitising (see June 24th Post)

Screenshot 2020-06-24 09.51.27

To play Ten Frame Flash you need:

A few sets of Digit Dog ten frame flash cards – large or small

To play:

Place the cards in a pile face down.

One player shows the top card and then turns it back again, the other players have to say how many dogs were on the card. The length of time that the card is revealed can get shorter as learners get better at recognising the patterns.

Encourage learners to recognise patterns and to work out the number without counting each dog.

How did you know how many there are? Explain your thinking.

Variations

  • For learners still practising counting accurately, turn over the cards and count each dog. Place an object on each dog and count the objects.
  • Use the five frame flash cards.
  • For a challenge: turn over the card, show the dogs and then hide them again. This time say one more than the number of dogs or one less than the number, e.g. if there were 4 dogs on the card, you would say “one more is 5” or “one less is 3”.

Try these on-line ten frame games:

https://gregtangmath.com/tenframemania

https://www.nctm.org/Classroom-Resources/Illuminations/Interactives/Ten-Frame/

Posted in Counting, Number sense, Subitising, Ten frames

Using ten frames

Show these slides for a couple of seconds to practise saying how many objects there are without counting in ones.

To play:

Open slideshow.

Click once to reveal an image, click again for it to disappear.

Ask: “How many Digit Dogs can you see?”

At first learners will want to count each dog and you will need to leave the image on the screen. Practise recognising the groups of dogs and saying how many there are without having to count each one. How quickly can you do this?

Being able to look at a small set of objects (up to 5) and say how many there are without counting in ones is called subitising. Once children can count objects accurately we want them to move onto subitising, this is an important step in the development of number sense.

It is easier to subitise if objects are arranged in recognisable patterns, such as the dice dot patterns or on ten-frames. The frames are used so that learners can relate numbers to 5 and 10, an important understanding for calculation.

DD4
I know there are 5 spaces in each row, so I can see this 4 in relation to 5. 4 is one less than 5.

 

Perceptual subitising – instantly recognising a small group of objects, usually up to 5 or 6.

DD3.jpgDD4.jpg

 

How many Digit Dogs can you see?

 

Conceptual subitising – seeing smaller groups of objects within a larger group to say how many there are without counting in ones. We do this when there are more than 5 or 6 objects.

 

I know there are 7 because I see 5 and 2 more.

Screenshot 2018-03-15 17.01.54.pngScreenshot 2018-03-15 17.02.01.png

I know there are 7 because I can see 4 and 3 more.

 

Posted in Counting, Games, Money

Collect the Coins – variations

Here are some variations for Digit Dog’s Collect the Coins game

Screenshot 2020-05-21 10.27.13

A game for two players

You need:

  • A counter for each player to move round the board.
  • A dice.
  • Coins to put in the bank (put them on the star).

To play the original game:

  • Each player choose a track and put your counter on start.
  • Take turns to throw the dice and move along the track.
  • Keep going round your track. If you land on the bank, collect two coins. If you pass through the bank, collect one coin.
  • The winner is the first to collect 5 coins.

Variations

Play the game until all the coins have gone from the bank. The winner is the person with the most coins. Count the coins then name the coins.

Put coins of different value in the bank. Play until all the coins have gone. The winner is the one with the largest amount of money.

Put coins of the same value in the bank e.g. all 5p coins to practise counting in 5s when the coins are totalled at the end of the game.

Decide on an amount to collect e.g. 10p. The winner is the first player to collect that amount exactly.

Posted in Counting, Games, Money

Collect the Coins

Play Digit Dog’s Collect the Coins game

Screenshot 2020-05-21 10.27.13

A game for two players

You need:

  • A counter for each player to move round the board
  • A dice
  • Ten coins to put in the bank (put them on the star)

To play:

  • Each player choose a track and put your counter on start.
  • Take turns to throw the dice and move along the track.
  • Keep going round your track. If you land on the bank, collect two coins. If you pass through the bank, collect one coin.
  • The winner is the first to collect 5 coins.
Posted in Counting, Fluency, Mathematical language

Counting leaves

Digit Dog is out in the garden again. This time he is counting leaves.

counting in threes

See if you can find some leaves that are arranged in threes.

Put the leaves in front of you, counting in threes as you go. Now take them away and count back in threes. Write the numbers you are saying. Find the numbers on digit cards or on a number line.

Digit Dog has 4 groups of 3 leaves. He has 12 leaves altogether.

What if he had 6 groups of 3 leaves? How many leaves would he have then?

What if he had 15 leaves altogether? How many groups of 3 would he have?

Make up some questions like this to ask someone about your set of leaves.

What about finding leaves that are arranged in different numbers?

leaves in nines

What do you think?

Posted in Conceptual understanding, Counting, Games

Target board 4 – counting and recognising numbers

An important part of learning mathematics is using and understanding mathematical vocabulary. Children need this vocabulary to talk about their work, to ask questions and to explain their thinking.

Target boards are grids with numbers or pictures that can be used to practise using mathematical language.

Target board 4

 

Counting and recognising numbers with Target Board 4

Print Target Board 4. Point at any box on the target board and ask children to say the number. Point to a number and ask children to say the number of tens and number of ones in that number.

Ask children to:

Find the number 12, or 50 or……….

Put the numbers in the first row in order. Which number is the smallest? Which number is the largest?

Find the largest number on the board.

Find the number that is one more than 35, one more than 11………

Find the number that is two more than 22, two more than 43………

Find the number that is one less than 12, one less than 28……….

Find the number that is two less than 38, two less than 10………

Find all the odd numbers. Find all the even numbers.

Does every column have an even number?

Does every column have an odd number?

Find the number that is ten more than 14, ten more than 40…….. What do you notice?

Find the number that is ten less than 55, ten less than 37…….. What do you notice?

Point at, or put counters on, two numbers. Count from the smallest number to the biggest number and back again.

Choose a number. Count from that number in 2s up to 60 or beyond. Now count back in 2s  to your number.

Choose a number. Count in tens from your number. How far can you count?

 

Now get children to ask their own questions so that they learn to use the correct vocabulary.

Make your own target board.

 

Posted in Conceptual understanding, Counting, Games

Target board 3 – counting and recognising numbers

An important part of learning mathematics is using and understanding mathematical vocabulary. Children need this vocabulary to talk about their work, to ask questions and to explain their thinking.

Target boards are grids with numbers or pictures that can be used to practise using mathematical language.

Target board 3

 

Counting and recognising numbers with Target Board 3

Print Target Board 3. Point at any box on the target board and ask children to say the number. Point to a number and ask children to collect that number of objects. Put sets of objects more than 10 into groups of 10 and some more, e.g. 17 objects will be organised into one group of 10 and 7 more. Put the objects onto 10 frames to support this idea of a group 10 and some more.

Ask children to:

Find the number 12, or 16 or……….

Put the numbers in the first row in order. Which number is the smallest? Which number is the largest?

Find the number that is one more than 13, one more than 8……….

Find the number that is two more than 16, two more than 7………

Find the number that is one less than 15, one less than 19……….

Find the number that is two less than 20, two less than 5………

Find an odd number. Find an even number.

Does every column have an even number?

Does every column have an odd number?

Find the number that is ten more than 6, ten more than 5…….. What do you notice?

Find the number that is ten less than 16, ten less than 15…….. What do you notice?

 

Now get children to ask their own questions so that they learn to use the correct vocabulary.

Play Bingo.

You need a board each, sets of digit cards 1 – 20 (you will need one set per player) and objects to cover the numbers on the board (use buttons, counters, milk bottle tops, small toys.

Shuffle the digit cards and place in a pile face down. Take turns to turn over the top card, say the number and cover it on your board. The first to cover the board is the winner.

Variations

The winner is the first to complete a row or a column.

Play Ten More / Ten Less Bingo. Use digit cards 0 – 20. Take turns to turn over the top card, but say the number that is either 10 more or 10 less than the number on the card and find the new number on your board.

 

 

Posted in Conceptual understanding, Counting, Games

Target board 2 – counting and recognising numbers

An important part of learning mathematics is using and understanding mathematical vocabulary. Children need this vocabulary to talk about their work, to ask questions and to explain their thinking.

Target boards are grids with numbers or pictures that can be used to practise using mathematical language.

Target board 2

 

Counting and recognising numbers with Target Board 2

Print Target Board 2. Point at any box on the target board and ask children to say the number. Point to a number and ask children to hold up that number of fingers or do that number of claps, or jump that number of times or collect that number of objects.

Ask children to:

Find the number 2, or 6 or……….

Find a number that is more than 4. Now find a number that is less than 8.

Find the largest number. Find the smallest number.

Put the numbers in the first row in order. Which number is the smallest? Which number is the largest?

Find the number that is one more than 5, one more than 9……….

Find the number that is two more than 3, two more than 7………

Find the number that is one less than 5, one less than 9……….

Find the number that is two less than 3, two less than 7………

Find an odd number. Find an even number.

Does every column have an even number?

Does every column have an odd number?

For numbers up to 20, try the same activities with Target Board 3.

 

Now get children to ask their own questions so that they learn to use the correct vocabulary.

Play Bingo.

You need a board each, sets of digit cards 1 – 20 (you will need one set per player) and objects to cover the numbers on the board (use buttons, counters, milk bottle tops, small toys.

Shuffle the digit cards and place in a pile face down. Take turns to turn over the top card, say the number and cover it on your board. The first to cover the board is the winner.

Variations

The winner is the first to complete a row or a column.

Play One More Bingo. Use digit cards 0 – 19. Take turns to turn over the top card, but say the number that is one more than the number on the card and find the new number  on your board.

Play One Less Bingo. Use digit cards 1 – 21. Take turns to turn over the top card, but say the number that is one less than the number on the card and find the new number on your board.

What about two more and two less bingo?

 

 

Posted in Conceptual understanding, Counting, Games

Target board 1 – counting

An important part of learning mathematics is using and understanding mathematical vocabulary. Children need this vocabulary to talk about their work, to ask questions and to explain their thinking.

Target boards are grids with numbers or pictures that can be used to practise using mathematical language.

 

Target board 1

Counting with Target Board 1

Print Target Board 1. Point at any box on the target board and ask: How many Digit Dogs can you see?  Do children count the dogs in ones or do they recognise the arrangement and say the number without counting?

Ask children to:

Point at 2 dogs, 3 dogs, 1 dog ……….

Point at 4 dogs. Now point at more than 4 dogs. Now point at fewer than 4 dogs.

Point at 3 dogs. Now point at 1 more than 3 dogs. Now point at 1 fewer than 3 dogs.

Ask:

Which boxes have the most dogs? Which boxes have the fewest dogs?

Which row has most dogs? Which column has fewest dogs?

How many dogs are in the first row altogether? What about the second row? And the third?

Point to some dogs and ask children to hold up that number of fingers or do that number of claps, or jump that number of times.

Now get children to ask the questions and use the correct vocabulary.

Play Match the Dogs. Put 4 sets of the Digit Dog cards face down in a pile. Take turns to turn over the top card and find the matching picture on your board. How many dogs are on your card? The winner is the first to cover their board.

Play Bingo. Have a board each, roll a dice, say the number rolled and cover that number of dogs with a milk-bottle top/ button/ counter. The winner is the first to cover their board.

Put 4 sets of digit cards 1 – 5 in a pile face down. Take turns to turn over the top card and match the number to the dogs on your board. First to cover their board wins.

Play One More Bingo. Put 4 sets of digit cards 0 – 4 in a pile face down. Take turns to turn over the top card, say the number that is one more than the number on the card and match that number to the dogs on your board. First to cover their board wins.

 

 

Posted in Calculating, Conceptual understanding, Counting, Fluency

Yet more flik-flaks: counting in steps of more than 1

Try using the flik-flaks to practise and use multiplication facts.

Practise counting in 2s by folding the Digit Dog flik-flak in half and asking:

  • How many dogs can you see?
  • How many eyes can you see?
  • How do you know? Tell me a number sentence.

Each dog has 2 eyes – 2, 4, 6, 8, 10

Five 2s equal 10,  5 lots of 2 equal 10, 5 groups of 2 equal 10, 2 five times equals 10,           5 x 2 = 10

1 dog has 2 eyes  1 x 2 = 2

2 dogs have 4 eyes  2 x 2 = 4

3 dogs have 6 eyes 3 x 2 = 6………..and so on

What patterns can you see? What do you notice about the number of eyes?

 

Repeat but this time count number of ears.

Challenge:

You can see 5 dogs but how many dogs are hidden? How many eyes are hidden? How did you work it out? Explain your thinking.

If I can see 12 eyes, how many dogs can I see?

Counting in steps of more than 2

You can practise counting in different steps by choosing different flik-flaks and repeating these activities. There are a range of flik-flaks available on www.primarytreasurechest.com

Use the star flik-flak to count in 5s.

Screenshot 2020-04-23 11.54.17

How many stars can you see? How many points? How did you work it out? What is the multiplication sentence?

If I can see 30 points, how many stars can I see?

Or the 10p coin flik-flak to count in 10s.

Screenshot 2020-04-23 11.58.51

How many coins? How many pence? How did you work it out? What is the multiplication sentence?