Posts

Posted in Counting, Number sense, Subitising, Ten frames

Ten frame games

1. Make the number

Screenshot 2020-06-24 11.27.44

You need:

For 3 – 5 players

Two sets of Digit Dog ten frames – large or small

Small objects such as pennies, buttons or counters.

To play:

One player is the leader and has the ten frame cards in a pile, face down.

Other players have a blank ten frame and ten small objects each.

The leader turns over the top card for a few seconds and then turns it back again.

Other players make the pattern they saw with objects on their ten frame.

The leader turns over the card again to check the patterns. Players who were correct score one point.

Play until all cards have been turned over, or one player reaches 10 points.

The winner is the player with most points.

Variations

  • Make the number on your ten frame one more than the number on the card.
  • Make the number on your ten frame two more than the number on the card.
  • Make the number on your ten frame one less than the number on the card.
  • Make the number on your ten frame two less than the number on the card.

 

2. Who has more?

 

Screenshot 2020-06-24 11.59.59

You need:

For 2 players

A set of Digit Dog ten frames for each player, in a pile face down.

To play:

On the count of 3, players turn over their top card. The player with more dogs wins the two cards and says “I have …….dogs. I have more dogs than you”. The other player says “I have ……. dogs. I have fewer dogs than you”.

The game ends when all cards have been turned over. The winner is the player with more cards.

Variation

  • The player with the fewer dogs wins the cards.
  • Say how many more and how many fewer dogs there are.Screenshot 2020-06-24 12.10.41
Posted in Counting, Number sense, Subitising, Ten frames

Ten frame flash

This game practises subitising (see June 24th Post)

Screenshot 2020-06-24 09.51.27

To play Ten Frame Flash you need:

A few sets of Digit Dog ten frame flash cards – large or small

To play:

Place the cards in a pile face down.

One player shows the top card and then turns it back again, the other players have to say how many dogs were on the card. The length of time that the card is revealed can get shorter as learners get better at recognising the patterns.

Encourage learners to recognise patterns and to work out the number without counting each dog.

How did you know how many there are? Explain your thinking.

Variations

  • For learners still practising counting accurately, turn over the cards and count each dog. Place an object on each dog and count the objects.
  • Use the five frame flash cards.
  • For a challenge: turn over the card, show the dogs and then hide them again. This time say one more than the number of dogs or one less than the number, e.g. if there were 4 dogs on the card, you would say “one more is 5” or “one less is 3”.

Try these on-line ten frame games:

https://gregtangmath.com/tenframemania

https://www.nctm.org/Classroom-Resources/Illuminations/Interactives/Ten-Frame/

Posted in Counting, Number sense, Subitising, Ten frames

Using ten frames

Show these slides for a couple of seconds to practise saying how many objects there are without counting in ones.

To play:

Open slideshow.

Click once to reveal an image, click again for it to disappear.

Ask: “How many Digit Dogs can you see?”

At first learners will want to count each dog and you will need to leave the image on the screen. Practise recognising the groups of dogs and saying how many there are without having to count each one. How quickly can you do this?

Being able to look at a small set of objects (up to 5) and say how many there are without counting in ones is called subitising. Once children can count objects accurately we want them to move onto subitising, this is an important step in the development of number sense.

It is easier to subitise if objects are arranged in recognisable patterns, such as the dice dot patterns or on ten-frames. The frames are used so that learners can relate numbers to 5 and 10, an important understanding for calculation.

DD4
I know there are 5 spaces in each row, so I can see this 4 in relation to 5. 4 is one less than 5.

 

Perceptual subitising – instantly recognising a small group of objects, usually up to 5 or 6.

DD3.jpgDD4.jpg

 

How many Digit Dogs can you see?

 

Conceptual subitising – seeing smaller groups of objects within a larger group to say how many there are without counting in ones. We do this when there are more than 5 or 6 objects.

 

I know there are 7 because I see 5 and 2 more.

Screenshot 2018-03-15 17.01.54.pngScreenshot 2018-03-15 17.02.01.png

I know there are 7 because I can see 4 and 3 more.

 

Posted in Logical reasoning, Patterns

Patterns in names

What patterns can you see on the grids? Describe the patterns on each grid. What do you notice?

Screenshot 2020-06-23 09.31.57

Screenshot 2020-06-23 09.51.40Screenshot 2020-06-23 09.50.21

If we added another row, can you predict which square you would colour in? Why do you say that? Explain your thinking.

Try your own name and look for patterns.

Print the 6 x 6 grid here. Write your name in the grid, one letter in each square, repeating it until all the squares are filled. Now colour in the squares which have the first letter of your name in them. What patterns have you made? Can you think of a way to describe the patterns?

Ask people you know to try it. What is the same and what is different about the patterns different names make?

What if you tried a larger grid?

Screenshot 2020-06-23 09.53.25

What has changed?

What about a smaller grid? What patterns can you see then?

Screenshot 2020-06-23 09.53.31

Try some different sized grids with your name.

Download grids

Grids 2 to 8,

Grids 9 and 10.

For more pattern activities go to Digit Dog’s home page, go to Categories and select Patterns

Posted in Logical reasoning, Problem solving

100 square jigsaw

Digit Dog and Calculating Cat are doing a 100 square jigsaw. They are looking at each piece and deciding where it goes on the grid.

Screenshot 2020-06-18 12.37.30

Have a go at completing the puzzle.

Download the blank grid here. Download this 100 square and cut along the thicker lines to create the jigsaw pieces.

Think about which piece you are going to put in first. Why have you chosen that one? Which piece has the lowest number on it? Where does that go? How do you know?

Where does the highest number go?

Whenever you place a piece on the board, explain why you are placing it there.

Can you see patterns to help you?

Challenge yourself

  • Turn all the pieces face down. Turn over one piece at a time and work out where it goes on the grid. Explain your thinking.
  • If you want to try an interactive version of this puzzle, go to https://nrich.maths.org/5572
  • Print this 100 square and cut out your own puzzle pieces for a friend to solve.

 

 

 

Posted in Calculating, Fluency, Games

Double your number

Play Double your number

You need:

A game board.

A set of counters for each player. One colour for each player. You can download Digit Dog counters here – print on card and cut out or print on paper and stick them on milk bottle tops.

A dice.

Screenshot 2020-06-16 11.35.19

To play:

Take turns to throw a dice.

Double the number you throw, find the answer on the board and put your counter on it.

The winner is the first player to get three counters in a row.

Variation

Use a set of digit cards 1 – 19 and this board. Take turns to turn over a card, double the number and cover the answer on the board.

 

 

 

 

Posted in Calculating, Fluency, Games

Pass the Peas, Please

Digit Dog and Calculating Cat are playing Pass the Peas Please, a game they found on www.nrich.org

Screenshot 2020-06-16 10.20.55

A game for 2 or more players

You need:

A game board

2 dried peas (or beans or counters or sweets).

A plastic cup.

A piece of paper and pencil for each player.

To play:

Each player begins by writing 50 on their piece of paper.

Player 1 places two dried peas into the plastic cup and tosses them onto the game board.

They add the two numbers the peas land on and then take the total away from 50 and write the answer on their score sheet.

The next player takes a turn.

In the following turns, the players take the sum of the numbers away from the new remaining number.

The first player to reach zero wins.

Variations

Start with 0 on your score card and keep a running total of scores. The winner is the first to reach 50.

Use one pea instead of 2 and either subtract the number the pea lands on from 50 or keep a running total.

Use 3 peas to play the game.

Change the number you start with on your score card – make it higher or lower.

Each player takes a turn to throw two peas and add the numbers. The player with the highest total wins that round. Play 10 rounds.

Each player takes a turn to throw two peas and add the numbers. The player with the lowest total wins that round. Play 10 rounds.

Each player takes a turn to throw two peas and finds the difference between the numbers. The player with the highest difference wins that round. Play 10 rounds.

Use this board and start with 10 or 20 on your score cards.

Make your own boards. Choose the numbers you put on the board.

Posted in Additive relationships, Calculating, Logical reasoning, Making totals

Finding pairs

Digit Dog and Calculating Cat are using one set of digit cards 1 – 10 and looking for pairs that make 10.

Screenshot 2020-06-15 09.32.44

Download a set of digit cards here. You will need cards 1 to 10. Print double-sided to have Digit Dog on the back!

Download a baseboard here. Print two.

How many pairs that make 10 can you make? Put the cards on the baseboard.

Can you use all the cards? Which cards are left over? Why?

Try making some other totals – remember you can only use one set of cards from 1 – 10.

What if you make 9? Which cards are left over? Why?

What about 8?  or 12?  or 13?  or 11? Investigate the number of pairs and the cards that you cannot use.

Record your work. Write down the pairs of numbers and their totals.

 

Posted in Calculating, Fluency, Games, Logical reasoning

Playing with cards 5

Memory addition

Screenshot 2020-06-11 09.14.09

Any number of players or teams of 2.

You need:

A pack of playing cards arranged in a 13 x 4 array, face down. Ace = 1, picture cards = 10.

To play:

Player 1 turns over 2 cards and adds the values. Player 1 then turns over another two cards and adds the values. If the totals match, player 1 keeps the 4 cards and has another turn. If they do not match, the cards are turned face down again and it is player 2’s turn.

The game continues until no more matches can be made.

Can you remember where cards are? How will this help you? Watch carefully when other players are turning over cards.

Variations

  1. Play the same game but subtract the pairs of cards. If the answers match, keep the cards and have another turn. If they don’t, turn them face down again.
  2. On each turn, turn over two cards. If the numbers match, keep the cards and have another turn. If they don’t match turn the cards face down again.
  3. On each turn, turn over two cards. If the numbers and colours match, keep the cards and have another turn. If they don’t match turn the cards face down again.
  4. On each turn, turn over two cards. If both numbers are odd or both even, keep the cards and have another turn. If they don’t match turn the cards back face down.
  5. Make up your own rules!

 

Posted in Calculating, Fluency, Games

Playing with cards 4

Odd addition

2 – 5 players

You need:

Digit cards 1 – 10 (a set for each player) or playing cards with the picture cards removed.

To play:

Shuffle the cards and place in the centre.

Each player takes two cards from the pile, adds the cards together and tells everyone the total.

If the total is odd, the player keeps the cards. If the total is even, the cards are returned to the centre pile.

Play ten rounds or until there are no cards left.

The winner is the player with most cards.

Screenshot 2020-06-08 12.22.57

Variations

  • Leave the picture cards in and give them a value e.g. J = 11, Q = 12, K =13
  • Subtract the numbers on the cards instead of adding.
  • Deal 3 cards to each person.
  • Keep adding the totals of the cards you keep. First player to reach a total of 50 wins.

 

Posted in Conceptual understanding, Fluency, Games, Logical reasoning

Playing with cards 3

Largest number

2 – 4 players

You need:

Digit cards 1 – 9  (one set per player, shuffled) or a pack of playing cards, Ace to 9 only.

To play:

Deal 2 cards to each player.

Players turn over their cards and make the largest 2-digit number they can with the cards they have been dealt.

The player with the largest number scores a point.

Play ten rounds. The winner is the player with most points.

Screenshot 2020-06-08 12.01.45

Variations

  • Deal 3 cards to each player and make 3-digit numbers.
  • Try 4 or 5- digit numbers.
  • Get a point for the smallest number rather than the largest.
  • Play more than 10 rounds.